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Proper Cooling: Your Food-Safe Culture Demands It

Last week, we had a great webinar presented by Dr. Paola Paez from the Center for Food Safety in Child Nutrition Programs at Kansas State University.  If you were not able to join us, please feel free to go back and review the webinar to learn some valuable ways in which you can implement safe cooling practices in your foodservice operation. In a perfect world, if any amount of cooling of food products within your operation was done, there would be a blast chiller.  Blast chillers are designed to expel hot air from the environment, whereas a regular cooler is only equipped to keep cold air, cold.  But, they are an expensive investment (estimate of $5,500 - $10,000 for counter model!) and once you invest...

When in Doubt, Throw it Out: Implications for Cost and Safety

When in doubt, throw it out is an adage that is embraced by those concerned about food safety.  While it is a good approach, it can cost a lot for an operation if food is unnecessarily wasted!  So, in this blog we are going to discuss strategies for eliminating, or at least reducing, the amount of food that is thrown out due to food safety concerns.  Active managerial control helps control costs while making sure that food served is safe to eat. Active managerial control will help remove the doubt so that good decisions can be made about whether or not food needs to be discarded. While there is a sense to toss food because of “an abundance of caution”, a little knowledge can save…

It’s All About Numbers: Performance Measures to Enhance Operational Effectiveness

There are a number of performance measures that can provide feedback to managers regarding effectiveness. In this first blog for May, we will discuss some of these tools and how they might be used for a foodservice. These assessments can track the effectiveness of many aspects including operational, financial, food safety, customer service, and human resources. Comparison with industry (external) or internal benchmarks can provide useful feedback on performance.   In the second blog for May, we will discuss some strategies to improve labor productivity, such as time-motion economy, ergonomics, and work simplification principles. As a side note, some research has found that the application of these techniques not only improves consistency and quantity of work, but leads to less fatigue and injury by workers...